The Sales Page to Product Secret Makes Product Creation Easy

Stumped on product creation?

Have a rough idea bouncing around in your head but not sure what information should be included?

Try this simple method for product ideas, getting through the outline process and final creation.

The way it works is when you have a general product idea in mind you sit down and create the sales letter before you make the actual product. I know you’re thinking this process is backwards from the norm, but I promise you, it’s okay!

This can really work wonders when you’re stuck at the beginning phases of creating a product and can’t find the momentum to get started.

Your sales page will help you flesh out a product as you think of the problems your new item can help solve. It will also act as a very handy product blueprint. Since you haven’t actually made the item, you are free to put in anything you believe will make it an outstanding value to your customers.

Don’t overly stress over the process. Don’t try to make it perfect.. just get things to a point where you can now start fleshing out your info product following the sales letter.

You can use each of your bullet points as topics or chapters to be expanded upon when you do the actual product creation. Remember that you will not be bound by the sales page you make. You can change the features of your product just by modifying the sales page. Your blueprint will then be ready to guide you through step by step till the end.

Here’s another tip:

Get the sales letter up with a subscription form instead of a buy button and send traffic to it from your existing list or through another source such as PPC.

Tell your visitors this particular product is pending release and if they are interested they can subscribe to an early bird alert list. To sweeten the deal offer them a special discount for signing up.

And one more powerful tip:

You may want to make the form extra informative by adding a feedback box where they can leave content ideas. A simple line such as “What information would you like to see included in this product?” can help you further refine the final deal.

If they’re truly interested they will subscribe to the notification list for the product release. If you get no interest then you’ll know not to pursue that particular project.

I wouldn’t suggest you use this for everything you do, but it does have its place. It can give you direction and very valuable feedback when needed.

There may be times when you get a small amount of signups, but not enough to warrant continuing with your idea. If this happens, do not leave those who signed up hanging in the wind. Send them a thank you email and a special gift for their time and feedback. This makes the experience a win-win deal for them and you.

Choosing a Niche Product to Dropship

Time and time again I recommend that you choose a niche product to dropship from your website or sell on eBay. But how do you choose your niche? The following are brainstorming tips to help you come up with a niche product that can be sold online.

First: Check Your Purchases. Many prospective online entrepreneurs try to think of really out-there products like unicycles or bamboo knitting needles so they can enter a market that isn’t too saturated. This is a good idea in some respects, but one of the most important factors when choosing a product is to choose something that people actually buy online. One way to brainstorm this type of product is to think what you yourself buy online.

In the past month, I’ve bought three second-hand novels written by Mildred Walker, a pair of studded motorcycle boots, a Hebrew-printed t-shirt, tickets to a murder mystery play, a pair of Cubs swim trunks, and a calligraphy set. Not surprisingly, almost all of my purchases represent niche markets. Why is that? Because with the exception of a few broad categories like electronics, most items bought online are niche products. This is because common, general products can easily be purchased at physical locations close to your home. You go online to find unusual items that can’t be bought at the mall.

Second: Check Logistics. Let’s assume that I want to dropship my products, not purchase them wholesale. This means that some of the products I purchased last month are out of the running for my niche inspiration. Used books aren’t generally dropshipped, and neither are theater tickets. Shoes and clothing are usually sold wholesale, but in this case the items that I bought might still be appropriate since they weren’t common apparel and accessories. The studded motorcycle boots might be a good candidate for a dropship niche product for a few reasons: first, they are a product that’s not easily found in local stores. I bought those boots online because after searching the three malls in my area I couldn’t find anything quirky enough to satisfy my Sarah Connor Chronicles obsession.

The studded motorcycle boots are a good pick for another reason: they’re a theme product that I could easily build a whole product line around. With the boots as my central product, I could have a goth/punk/emo website, a motorcycle apparel site, or a studded leather accessories site. Finally, while I might not be able to find this product through a dropship supplier, they are expensive enough that I could possibly use a wholesaler to dropship them. Let’s say my wholesale supplier has a $100 order minimum: if a single pair of studded boots costs $125, I can likely have single pairs shipped directly to my customers even though the supplier is ostensibly a wholesaler.

Stay tune for more tips on choosing a niche to dropship products.

What a Lawyer Must Prove to Win a Product Liability Case

Thousands of injuries occur each year in the United States from defective or dangerous products. Victims of dangerous defective products have legal protection under product liability laws throughout the country. These laws govern the legal rules that determine who can be held liable for the defect or danger to consumers.

In general, products sold to the public are required to meet common expectations of consumers. When those products have an unexpected defect, common expectations of consumers are not met.

More than one party could be held liable for injuries that occur from consumer use of a defective product. This includes all sellers that are part of the distribution chain for making the product. Parties that are potentially liable for a defective product include the manufacturer, parts supplier, wholesaler and the retail store from which the product was purchased by the consumer.

The type of defect will determine who is responsible for a liability claim. All of the specifics related to a product liability case may differ among states. However, there are certain elements that a lawyer must prove to win a product liability case for his or her client. These elements include:

  • Injury and/or loss was caused by the product
  • Product was defective
  • Manufacturer’s error led to flaw in product
  • Manufacturer failed to warn consumers about potential dangers
  • Product was used correctly

Product Caused Injury and/or Loss

An actual injury or loss is a crucial element for a lawyer in proving a product liability claim. Specifically, the injury or loss must be a direct result of the product’s defect. In some cases, demonstrating the link between an injury and product defect is straightforward. In other cases, proving that the defect caused the injury or loss is not so easy.

For instance, a client was injured in a car accident while driving a vehicle prone to flipping over. If there is evidence that the client was speeding when the accident occurred, the manufacturer could argue that reckless driving – not the design of the vehicle – caused the accident.

However, a client could suffer third-degree burns when a brand new electric tea kettle explodes because of a hairline crack. The client did nothing out of the ordinary while using the tea kettle and could have a strong injury claim.

Product is Flawed Due to Manufacturer’s Error

In addition to proving that the product caused an injury or loss, the lawyer must also prove that the same product is defective. For some cases, the defect could be the result of a problem at the manufacturing plant. For others, the defect is within the product design, which means that the entire product line is dangerous for consumer use.

A lawyer might have a harder time proving that there was a flaw in the product design. The most likely scenario is demonstrating that an unreasonable design created the danger. However, a product that has potential danger is not automatically a judgment against the manufacturer or supplier when an injury occurs.

There are times when designing a product in a cost-effective or reasonable way is not feasible. Consider the potential dangers of vehicle air bags. While they can cause serious injury to a driver or passenger, they can also save lives in certain collisions. Car manufacturers would argue that when alternative outcomes are considered, air bags are not unreasonably dangerous.

Manufacturer Failed to Warn Consumers of Potential Dangers

Typically, a lawyer might have a better chance at proving an injury or loss occurred from a defective design when the average consumer is not aware of the dangerous quality. A ruling in such cases may depend on whether the manufacturer failed to warn consumers of the potential dangers. The manufacturer or supplier must show that instructions and warnings were reasonably sufficient.

In this case, a client might suffer third-degree burns from an electric tea kettle because the steam valve is concealed by some part of the product design. An average consumer would expect to find a visible spout from where steam is released. Instead, the steam valve is placed in an inconspicuous area, which strengthens a defective design claim.

Proving defective design is problematic if the tea kettle included bright red stickers printed with the word “caution” and the user manual included warnings about the steam valve position. The legal question now becomes whether the warnings were adequate.

Injured Client Used Product Correctly

Generally, the lawyer’s client must use the product correctly; that is, the way the manufacturer intended the product to be used. Continuing with the tea kettle example, an example would be if the explosion occurs when used to heat water for an outdoor kinds’ pool is not the intended use.

If the kettle explodes and causes burns, the lawyer may not be able to prove manufacturer liability. The manufacturer is not required to make the tea kettle safe for use with an outdoor pool.

However, this does not mean that use of every product must conform to the manufacturer’s specifications. The key is proving whether the average consumer would or would not use the product in the same manner as the client. If so, the lawyer has met the reasonable expectation of use requirement.

Winning a product liability case involves deciphering often complex circumstances and establishing a good legal theory. A lawyer who is knowledgeable of product liability law and the litigation process will craft a strategy to prove the case. An immediate investigation into the facts surrounding the case could expose obvious defective issues. Further, expert testimony is often essential in proving that a defective design caused an injury and/or loss.